Artist Feature: Bryan Lazano

Artist Feature: Bryan Lazano

In his middle school woodshop class, senior Brayan Lozano “discovered [his] passion for building, constructing, designing, drawing and planning.” The self taught 3D printing enthusiast has been working with 3D printers since he was a freshmen at the Allen Stevenson School and has continued to do so at Riverdale. Since 3D printers were still an up and coming technology that many people did not know how to use, he taught himself how to use them by creating small projects.

Using the original Makerbot Replicator, some of his earlier designs include replicating lego pieces, making small caricatures, and creating personalized keychains. Lozano notes that the machine was “very quirky, did not function perfectly, and had many flaws.” Despite the flaws in the machine, Lozano recognizes that “you learn best when things go wrong, and 3D printers go wrong all the time.”

Bryan Lazano's 3D Printed Oreo.

Bryan Lazano's 3D Printed Oreo.

Because he was constantly improving his 3D printing skills, Lozano was able to create larger and more intricate designs. In his efforts to create more difficult objects, Lozano learned that “the 3D printer has specific capabilities, and it can’t print whatever you want.” To create larger objects, he had to “print [them] in multiple pieces.” One of his first larger designs was a bat “that had wings, legs and arms.” Brayan had to print each individual limb separately to avoid breaking the machine.

Before he can print his 3D object, Brayan needs to create a digital design using a 3D printing software application. Some of the applications that he has used include Autodesk, Tinkercad, and SketchUp. He then prints his designs using Riverdale’s MakerBot Replicator 2x 3D printer. The 3D printer allows Lozano to create items in less than twenty-four hours at an inexpensive price.

When asked by the SFC to create a prototype of a whipped cream dispenser, Brayan was able to create the dispenser for one dollar. Had he sent his design to a company to make out of metal or plastic, “it would have cost about twenty to fifty dollars.” To make the prototype, Lozano took measurements of a whipped cream can and modeled around it.

The prototype dispenser consists of a gray cube with a hole in the middle to fit the whipped cream inside of it. It has a moveable, blue structure attached to the cube that is perfectly measured to touch the nozzle. When pressure is applied to the blue structure, whipped cream is dispensed through the nozzle of the whipped cream can. Although it is only the first prototype, the dispenser is able successfully to dispense whipped cream. The SFC was surprised “that [Lozano] was able to make it really quickly,” and “they didn’t anticipate that it was going to work that well that fast.”

Bryan Lazano's Drone Senior Project.

Bryan Lazano's Drone Senior Project.

Athlete Feature: Lukas Grattan

Athlete Feature: Lukas Grattan

Riverdale Arts Weekend