The Brueur Exhibit at the Met

The Brueur Exhibit at the Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has opened up a new space on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The Met Breuer (BROY-ER) is located in a building previously occupied by the Whitney Museum of American Art and was designed by prominent architect Marcel Breuer, for whom the new space is named. The Breuer was introduced by the Met’s modern and contemporary art program to display works of this nature. The Breuer’s current exhibition is entitled “Unfinished: Thoughts Left

This exhibition began on the third floor and displayed works of art ranging from the Renaissance to the 20th century. The exhibition displayed a dense concentration of masterpieces: works of Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Manet, Monet, Klimt and an entire room dedicated to Turner’s

While I appreciated this impressive collection of masterpieces, the works of art displayed on the third floor of the Breuer cannot quite be classified as “modern and contemporary art,” a circumstance with which I took fault. This floor seemed to be used as more of opportunity for the Met to showcase a plethora of impressive pieces in its collection than to specifically target contemporary art.

The later half of the exhibition, located on the fourth floor, was where I found the works of Basquiat and Jasper Johns that I had anticipated seeing in this space supposedly designated for modern art. This came as a pleasant surprise to me as I had seen little modern art thus far in the exhibition. Basquiat’s “Piscine Versus the Best Hotels” was one of my favorite pieces in the collection.

Basquiat's  Piscne Versus the Best Hotels .

Basquiat's Piscne Versus the Best Hotels.

I also found myself grappling with the exhibition’s theme of unfinished art. Senior Teddy Landis noted that the exhibition: “I thought it was a unique theme for a major museum to pursue, especially as its inaugural

Unique is right. While I very much enjoyed the pieces displayed in this exhibition, I did not find the heading of “Unfinished Art” to be a particularly effective method of categorization. Many of the pieces displayed were intentionally unfinished as a means of political statement or stylistic choice.  Others were unfinished undeliberately. In many cases, the artist had passed away in the middle of their composition. The pieces were unfinished for a variety of different reasons and there was no unifying theme to tie them together other than the random circumstance of not being

While I was surprise with some of my discoveries at this exhibition, the Met Breuer is definitely worth a visit. Admission to the Breuer is free (there is a suggested entry donation) and open to the public Tuesday through Sunday.

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